• baby goat petting zoo party is the new office morale booster

    Totes M’Goats, it’s true! A mobile baby goat petting zoo can come to your home or workplace

    Time is running out to book a mobile baby goat petting zoo party featuring one month old Nigerian Dwarf goat kids at the Seattle area location of your choosing. For 90 minutes and weeks afterwards, morale will be lifted and smiles will be wide as you enjoy visiting with and holding these sweet creatures. Farmer Venise will teach you all about the kids and raising goats if you’d like, or you can keep it simple and just lounge with them. If I was back in my old workplace party planning chair, I’d keep it simple and buy a bunch of ice cream bars and send out an email that says…

  • 5 Tips for Building Raised Garden Beds

    It’s been a while since I (Venise) blogged. When it comes to our strengths Belinda is the stronger writer so I generally let her shine on the blog while I dig in the dirt. But, I am excited to share some gardening tips with you so I taking a break from the dirt to try to put some words on a “page”. Since Ross and I have been feverishly working to rebuild our raised garden beds and get everything installed in time for the busy growing season it is a great time to share 5 tips for building raised garden beds. Leave enough room for your equipment I am making…

  • female farmers harvest herbs in field

    FarmHer: the Simple Goodness Sisters’ TV debut on RFDTV

    This weekend we will be making our debut on NATIONAL television on the RFDTV network, on season 3 of FarmHer. It's nothing short of incredible that this opportunity to be profiled by the network for our work as female farmers and food producers came our way, as it is one of Venise's "bucket list" accomplishments! Read more to see where and when to watch, and listen to our episode on Farmher's Shining Bright podcast!

  • First Arrival: Sade’s Baby Goats

    The time is FINALLY here! We welcomed our first baby goats yesterday! In years past we have always kidded in April and May, but this year our buck’s schedule was pretty full so we waited until January to breed the girls which meant that our kidding dates are in June this year. Our first doe to kid was Sade. Sade is four years old and this was Sade’s second birth, as her breeding didn’t take last year. Last time she kidded she had two does (girls) and we kept both of them in our herd. Lucy is due this month for the first time, while it appears Ethyl didn’t spend quite…

  • 2016 Gardens: planting seeds and having faith

    Happy Easter everyone! With Easter we celebrate the victory of life over death and dwell in the possibility and promise of miracles. We had a beautiful day celebrating the day with all of our family and eating all of the things.  We hope the same for you and yours! Speaking of having faith, the last frost date is a long standing point of contention between farmers and gardeners and our Lord. We await Spring with building apprehension, wanting to get started with planting, but must wait for that last frost to pass or risk losing it all. It takes a lot of faith and patience to wait and we’re like toddlers in a…

  • Winter Farm Update

    Since Belinda posted about her exciting Happy Camper Cocktail updates I figured it was time to post a winter farm update. Winter is a pretty slow time on the farm which is good because it gives us time to catch up on projects we don’t get to during the busier seasons. This winter Farmer Ross has been focusing on selling some of the extra equipment we have laying around which will give us the room and funds to buy some new equipment. One of our most recent purchases included some refrigerators and freezers we bought to store our farm produce and meat. Our local grocery store went out of business which is a…

  • The signs of labor in cows

    Two years ago we welcomed our very first calf on the farm when Mama struggled through labor and delivered a healthy heifer (girl) calf we named Mae. Fast forward two years and our baby is all grown up and having babies of her own. Mae is scheduled to calve sometime soon. If we were full time farmers who had the opportunity to spend more time in the barn and less time in our corporate offices we would have been regularly observing and recording Mae’s heat cycles and would know when she was bred. But, alas, we are busy modern day farmers who work day jobs and try to do our best when…

  • Kitchen Gardens 2015 summarized

    Seed selection, garden planning and raised bed research occupied my mind this Spring. With the arrival this week of the Baker Creek seed catalog in the mail, this fervor has been re-awakened. I am already excited for the work to come in Spring. With the same fervor I once felt for planning cute outfits for warmer weather, making shopping lists in my mind and sketching fashions to fill my endless supply of blue cover spiral notebooks (needs to be blue, always blue- OCD much?), I now plan for fresh produce. Last Spring I dwelled in the pages of the Whole Seed Catalog by the Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company like it…

  • Happy Thanksgiving

    It’s almost Thanksgiving! Are you ready? Last year, the farm hosted an epic  Thanksgiving feast for FIFTY people so this year we are taking Thanksgiving off. We will sit back, let my aunt work her tail off making the meal and hosting our crazy, fabulous family and bask in the gluttony that is Thanksgiving. But, it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving if we didn’t cook our own bird so Farmer Ross will still fire up the propane heater later this weekend and deep fry our farm raised turkey. We have never raised turkeys before, and quite frankly, we have zero interest in raising turkeys in the future (I have heard horror stories that they…

  • Growing Garlic: Cutting Scapes

    Farmer Ross and I have gotten a lot of questions recently filled with anxiety and enthusiasm asking “what should I be doing with my garlic”?  Because garlic is a winter crop, it is often one of the first crops to be harvested in the summer. Since I had so many questions this year I thought I would write a quick post about what the next few months entail for all you budding garlic farmers! First, if you are growing hardneck garlic in the Pacific Northwest, your scapes should be ready to cut. I usually cut ours as soon as the scape has made a full curl. The scapes are the…