• First Arrival: Sade’s Baby Goats

    The time is FINALLY here! We welcomed our first baby goats yesterday! In years past we have always kidded in April and May, but this year our buck’s schedule was pretty full so we waited until January to breed the girls which meant that our kidding dates are in June this year. Our first doe to kid was Sade. Sade is four years old and this was Sade’s second birth, as her breeding didn’t take last year. Last time she kidded she had two does (girls) and we kept both of them in our herd. Lucy is due this month for the first time, while it appears Ethyl didn’t spend quite…

  • Winter Farm Update

    Since Belinda posted about her exciting Happy Camper Cocktail updates I figured it was time to post a winter farm update. Winter is a pretty slow time on the farm which is good because it gives us time to catch up on projects we don’t get to during the busier seasons. This winter Farmer Ross has been focusing on selling some of the extra equipment we have laying around which will give us the room and funds to buy some new equipment. One of our most recent purchases included some refrigerators and freezers we bought to store our farm produce and meat. Our local grocery store went out of business which is a…

  • Corporate Herdsmanship

    When it comes to my food, I like to keep things separate. If it was socially acceptable I would probably still use one of those kid plates with dividers so all the food stays neat in it’s place. But, when it comes to my life, I prefer to mix it up. In practice this means I check and respond to work emails in the middle of doing farm chores. I blog during my commute to work. I think about my daughter in the middle of work meetings. It means that whether I am at work, at home or in the barn, I am not 100% fully there, part of me is somewhere…

  • The signs of labor in cows

    Two years ago we welcomed our very first calf on the farm when Mama struggled through labor and delivered a healthy heifer (girl) calf we named Mae. Fast forward two years and our baby is all grown up and having babies of her own. Mae is scheduled to calve sometime soon. If we were full time farmers who had the opportunity to spend more time in the barn and less time in our corporate offices we would have been regularly observing and recording Mae’s heat cycles and would know when she was bred. But, alas, we are busy modern day farmers who work day jobs and try to do our best when…

  • A letter to Deyton

    Dear Deyton, Yesterday a very wealthy couple, Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg, wrote a letter to their newborn daughter, Max, with a plan and a pledge to donate $45 billion dollars to help ensure that your generation grows up in a world better than ours today. As I read the news, I was thankful that a couple with so much power, because of the money they have made, feel morally responsible to make the world a better place not just for their own child but for every child. But, I also felt a little small, a little insignificant. You see, like Priscilla and Mark, I also want to make the world a better place and there are…

  • Growing Garlic: Cutting Scapes

    Farmer Ross and I have gotten a lot of questions recently filled with anxiety and enthusiasm asking “what should I be doing with my garlic”?  Because garlic is a winter crop, it is often one of the first crops to be harvested in the summer. Since I had so many questions this year I thought I would write a quick post about what the next few months entail for all you budding garlic farmers! First, if you are growing hardneck garlic in the Pacific Northwest, your scapes should be ready to cut. I usually cut ours as soon as the scape has made a full curl. The scapes are the…

  • Our Weekend Adventures and Baby Goats

    Man things around the farm are busy! In Washington we all look forward to this time of year when the gray skies start to clear and summer takes shape. On the farm, the spring and summer are the busiest parts of the year and this year is going to be no different. In an effort to get some last minute R&R before the craziness of summer takes over, our family took a short trip across the mountains to Lake Chelan for Kate’s 14th birthday! Originally Kate wanted to go to the ocean and go clam digging but the warmer than normal weather brought upon an algae attack in the ocean and they…

  • Egg Bound Chicken

    To be a great farmer, one must also be a great detective. Because our animals cannot speak to us in words, we spend a lot of time trying to guess their needs. Over the past few days we have had the chance to hone our detective skills when we noticed one chicken who wasn’t being her usual chicken self. Rather than hanging out with the other chickens she has been laying in the goat stall on the ground, which is never a good sign. When the other chickens were flocking to the feeder in the morning fighting for food, she hardly turned her head, an even worse sign. It didn’t take…

  • The Future of Breastmilk

    It seems that milk is all the rage these days! Have you been to the dairy section of your local grocer lately? The other day I took a gander down the dairy isle of our local grocer and was shocked at how many types of milk there are.  I had no idea almonds had nipples! It used to be that you chose milk based on fat content, nonfat (water) 1% (water with a splash of milk), 2% (water with a shot of milk), whole milk (the good stuff) and if you are lucky to live in a state that allows people to make their own choices about the food they consume you get an…