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Mary’s Simple Goodness Sisters’ Sidecar

We, and about 200,000 other people have been inspired by Mary Heffernan as an entrepreneur, woman and mother for a long time. Venise began following her on Instagram and like so many others, was captivated immediately by the story of serial-entrepreneur Mary, her husband, and their 4 daughters (all named Mary) who moved from Silicon Valley after owning and selling her first few businesses there, to fulfil their dreams of ranching in rural Northern California. Since that beginning, they’ve grown their ranch into one of the most successful, direct to consumer food businesses that Instagram & North America has ever seen. As folks trying in our own way to do something similar with Simple Goodness Sisters, that is create a high quality and high engagement, woman-led food brand that is equally as focused on how products are made as how they taste, we’re really interested in learning from Five Mary’s.

What captivates us as business people is the idea that she has reached this level of success by creating authentic connection between her and her buying community by sharing honestly and in detail the lifestyle and hardwork that bring Five Mary’s Farm Raised beef and pork from their ranch to the customer’s mailboxes. She allows people to feel a day in the life through her Instastories and posts and in turn, she finds dedicated customers who feel, albeit through technology, more closely connected with the food on their plates. By essentially creating their own sales pipeline and providing consumer education on American farming and ranching in a compelling way (that big time food advertisers would pay 1 billion dollars for but still never get right), they’ve also maintained control and distribution of their business entirely. This is crazy cool to us.

The Farm has grown in an organic but ambitious trajectory, with Mary still packing orders with a small team of friends and family each week from the farm store in nearby Fort Jones, CA. Yet, they continue to feed their dreams AND feed people’s purchasing and engagement desires, through Glamping offerings on the farm, apparel and other soft goods, a small business workshop, a newly released Whiskey, and a restaurant and bar. Which brings us to where our fandom turned to partnership! After a few Intagram conversations back and forth (yes we dropped into her DM’s, as the kids say) Mary reached out and asked to sample Simple Goodness Sisters simple syrups for use at their bar in cocktails and mocktails.

While her husband enjoys a sunset Coors Light on their evening feeding drives (just like my own Mr. Kelly), Mary is a brown drinker after my own heart. Mary loves the Bourbon Sidecar, a classic and delicious bourbon cocktail that totally appeals to me as well. If you like whiskey AT ALL or if you’re a new to whiskey, curious toes dipping in the holy water kind of brown spirit drinker, you need to try this cocktail!

Mary’s Lemon-Herb Bourbon Sidecar

Why to make it: a good entry for newcomer’s to brown liquor cocktails, the sidecar is from the sour category so the liquor is not too pronounced, and it can easily be made sweeter with the addition of more syrup. It’s a quick happy hour or pre-dinner drink, not meant to be lingered over, but to set a tone or ease you into your evening.

Makes 1 cocktail

  • 2 ounces bourbon
  • 1/2 ounce Cointreau orange liqeur
  • 1 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce lemon herb syrup
  • fresh herb leaf for garnish- thyme sprig or sage

Combine the lemon juice, bourbon, cointreau and syrup in a shaker of ice, shake for 60 seconds or until the outside of the shaker is chilled and the ingredients within are extremely cold and a little bit foamy. Strain into a coupe or martini glass. Garnish.

Mary’s Lemon-Herb Sidecar Mocktail

Why to make it: while the sidecar is an alcohol forward drink, mainly comprised of liquor, the essences of the drink can be distilled into a good back porch sipping tea, that while not completely similar in taste, evokes a similar mood.

Makes 1 cocktail

  • 2 ounces brewed and chilled chamomile tea
  • 1/2 ounce fresh orange juice
  • 2 dashes orange or citrus bitters
  • 1 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 ounce lemon herb syrup
  • fresh herb leaf for garnish- thyme sprig or sage

Combine the juice, tea and syrup in a shaker of ice, shake for 60 seconds or until the outside of the shaker is chilled and the ingredients within are extremely cold and a little bit foamy. Strain into a coupe or martini glass. Add two drops of bitters, stir. Garnish.

The "garden" behind the garden to glass cocktails, Venise is the resident farmer of the Simple Goodness Farm, older sister and goat lover.

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